Go with a Flow

For many people, their biggest befuddlement is trying to select a tulip blend for their yard. Well, I’ve got a solution: Try multiple blends. Combining more than one is a blast. You become an artist and the whole neighborhood shares the pleasure. That’s what Colorblends does at their Spring Garden and I can attest firsthand: Making several blends flow is major fun. Plus, The Garden also proves that you don’t need a whole lot of real estate to stage this thriller. A few square feet are all it takes. The Starting Point Here’s one secret to success when mingling more than one blend: Select a shared color to “talk” between them. This year, The Garden featured blends all with white as part of their display for a common theme. It worked like a charm. Even though each blend has a different personality and several different colors, the white factor brings them together. Using the white common denominator, you can couple Zephyr with Four-Star. There is a critical factor to make this work: If you want several blends to coincide, be sure select ones that bloom at the same time. Don’t worry; Colorblends has you covered. They’ve done their homework on timeframes. In the catalog, they make synchronizing easy by keying out early, midseason, and late performing blends. Color Conversations White is the easiest place to start, but you could become more daring. Yellow is a vibrant, cheerful hue that is worked into many blends. Use that shared color to make blends intersect. At The Garden, Pink Margarita was planted beside Tukano. The yellows in both make them speak the...

The Gold Standard

Put on your sunglasses because the daffodils are going for the gold with gusto. Ever notice that spring parades out a color palette big on primary colors? In fact, you’ll see a whole lot of yellow going on. And it’s not only the daffodils. Forsythias play a big part in the pageant and flowering dogwoods like Cornus mas also collude in the conspiracy. Dandelions have their day in the sun. At the Colorblends House and Spring Garden, the daffodils are the common denominator pushing the gold standard. The beauty of daffodils is they synchronize beautifully—no guesswork involved. Not so Mellow Yellow Because one goal at Colorblends is to illustrate the history behind bulbs, we figured that a section of the garden planted to the big cup golden trumpet daffodils would provide a touchstone that you all know and love. These are the daffodils you see from down the street when you’re cruising around in spring. You probably affectionately called them ‘King Alfred’ — because that variety was once the crowd pleaser. But times change, breeding improves, and we’ve now got some superdeluxe large trumpet daffodils that frankly rub ‘King Alfred’s nose in the dirt. Yes, we show you some bonafide ‘King Alfred’ from our Oldies but Goodies arsenal, but we also roll out a strip of ‘Marieke’, ‘Golden Harvest’, and ‘Dutch Master’ right alongside and we bet you will find them equally bedazzling and more dependable. Softening the Statement That said, we knew you would want to mix in some other shades as well, so our display tones down yellow’s Big Bang with plenty of creamy white and orange...